#girlboss - how they are keeping it consciously real

 
 
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Bethany shorb + cyberoptix tie lab

Home of the original “Ties That Don't Suck, since 2006", located behind the world reknown Detroit Farmers' Market, Cyberoptix started as a one woman production silk screening on ties enterprise that has evolved into a Detroit institution. We sat down to find out, from owner and creative director, Bethany Shorb, how a sly punk idea played itself into an international juggernaut on the handmade tie, scarf and tee industry while maintaining its bespoke, expressive elegance.

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Lindsey + kaylan + the getup vintage

Walking into the Getup Vintage, Lindsey Leyland and Kaylan Mitchell ‘s store on State Street in Ann Arbor, is a bit of a time warp - the clothes on display, from flared pants to boho maxies feel kind of back in the day when protests were thick, love and change were in the air, and possibilities for a sustainable future seemed endless. Full circle on the protests, the once radical U of M campus still sports a healthy sense of what can be possible - the place is solar powered, off the grid, and mainly carries materials made in America. Fast fashion has no place in this low-waste, super cool independently owned vintage mecca. We sat down with Lindsey and Kaylan and learned how they transitioned from shop girls to #Girlbosses.

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kathryn sterner + winsome goods

When we think of fashion we still think of the big cities as the place to be. In this country that’s definitely New York followed (and how far behind is up for debate) Los Angeles. Others might argue the relevancy of say…Atlanta or Chicago. So it might surprise you that it’s in Minneapolis where we found Kathryn Sterner living a life that might make some of our NYC designer friends rethink their locale. Not only has she successfully built up her own brand which is created in a beautiful light filled atelier but she did it after graduating from college without a mountain of debt. How did she do it?